Flood recovery works

Significant repairs Recovery works Map of works Important information

Responding to high priority road hazards caused by weather eventsOur local road network has suffered significant damage following the February 2022 flood.

Don't remove or tamper with traffic lights or road signage – it puts people at risk and it's illegal. Read more.

The very large volumes of emails, letters and calls since the floods are impacting on recovery works. Before you contact us please review the information on this page and read our weekly flood recovery update, which provides you with the latest news on how the Tweed is recovering and rebuilding following the floods. Read more about your part in roads flood recovery.

As our road crews and contractors undertake the enormous task of fixing our roads, we ask motorists to please:

  • have patience
  • slow down and drive to the conditions
  • understand that some repairs are only temporary until a more permanent fix can be completed
  • be aware of changed traffic conditions.

Significant repairs

Landslips are responsible for most of our expected long-term road closures.

Geotechnical investigations are underway, however the design and construction of these repairs will take many months to complete.  

Caution Short delay 

Last updated 30 November 2022

Scenic Drive restoration cropped.jpg

Motorists using Scenic Drive are advised that from Thursday, 1 December 2022,  there will be a change in road conditions.

Contractor Australian Marine and Civil Pty Ltd (AMC), will be sealing the new restored section of road at site B, the major slip on Scenic Drive on Thursday morning.

Once completed, traffic will switch lanes on Thursday afternoon so that stormwater drainage work can be carried out on the northern side of the existing lane.

This work is expected to take about 2 weeks.

Traffic lights will still be functioning for this site as only one lane will be in use.

Further work will involve kerb and guttering, batter works, guard rail instalment and line marking. 

On the eastern slip, site A, foundation works have commenced. Boring of concrete support piles has commenced and this will be followed by building the retaining structure. 

Once this is completed, work will then commence on pavement works, kerb and guttering, batter works, lighting and the installation of guard rails. 

The road is open with a temporary one lane access to all vehicles under traffic control. There is no footpath or pedestrian access.

Motorists are advised to expect extended delays between 9 am and 3 pm as contractors bring in material and equipment.

Traffic controllers will monitor flows and meet the needs of peak demand times so please be patient and allow extra time for travel.

AMC’s original time schedule is planned for all works to be completed by the end of March 2023.

Given good progress to date, work is highly likely to be finalised earlier (weather permitting).

Council will continue to provide updates as more information comes to hand.

 

The process of rebuilding

Listed below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslips at Scenic Drive. Given our current knowledge of the site, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel. All work is dependent on weather conditions. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (completed)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Scenic Drive’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Funding submissions (completed)

Funding, we will need to seek approval for the preferred solution from Transport for NSW, which includes cost estimates based on the geotechnical investigations.

  • Design and construction tender (completed)

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment (underway)

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Scenic Drive, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

 

  • Construction (underway)

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Scenic Drive would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works. 

Caution Closed 

Last updated 30 November 2022

Road closure and road works, business support and viability and health and well-being issues were among key concerns discussed at a round table meeting between Tyalgum business and community representatives and NSW Government agencies and Council at Tyalgum on 16 November.

Held at the Tyalgum Hotel, which is currently being refurbished in preparation of a mid December opening, the meeting agenda covered a wide range of issues identified as by the Tyalgum community as having major impacts.

Council Director Engineering David Oxenham provided and update on the engagement of contractors and consultants looking at not only restoring the major land slip but also slips on Limpinwood Road.

Mr Oxenham said Council, in consultation with Transport for NSW, was looking at what would be the best approach to the Flood Recovery work, reassuring the meeting that Tyalgum road access was among Council’s top priorities.

Council is also addressing directional signage to Tyalgum and following up on request to assess speed zones on Limpiinwood and Zara Roads.

The major landslip on Tyalgum Road is about 950 metres east of Van Den Broek Road. There is another slip about 1 km west of this major landslip.

The damage site is more than 100 metres in width, some 60 metres in length and appears to comprise of some 6-10 metres depth of material which has slipped.

Geotechnical engineers have advised Council that results from test drilling show that it is not safe for a temporary track to be created as the continued movement poses an unacceptable public safety risk for a public road.

Ongoing geotechnical monitoring at the site will provide additional data to assess if this continues to be the case.

In the meantime, short-listed construction contractors are commencing the Concept design stage with the aim of having designs and tender pricing to Council by mid-December. 

The contractors are using the geotechnical reports Council received in September and are supplementing this information with further geotechnical drilling being carried out at the site this and next week.

Once designs are complete, Council will select the most suitable contractor to carry out the work, with works expected to start on site in mid-2023.

Transport for NSW has confirmed in principle funding approval to cover the cost of repairs.

Tyalgum Road landslip, geotechnical investigation

Traffic arrangements

The geotechnical investigation found the roadway too dangerous for temporary repairs at the site of the main slip, about 950 metres east of Van Den Broek Road. This section of Tyalgum Road will remain closed until permanent repairs can be undertaken.

This is a major landslip which extends from land above the slip, across the road and down to the Oxley River. Restoration will be very challenging.

One-way traffic arrangements at the secondary landslip site, about 1 km west of the main slip, will remain in place.

The process of rebuilding

The list below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslips at Tyalgum Road. Given our current knowledge of the sites, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Tyalgum Road’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Tyalgum Road, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Tyalgum Road would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Caution Short delay 

Last updated 30 November 2022

As works have progressed significantly on Kyogle Road, speed zoning and signage will be updated between Byangum and Clarrie Hall Dam over the next few weeks.

Motorists are advised to watch for changed traffic conditions and follow workplace signage, as speed zones are enforceable and keep workers and motorists safe.

Major patching continues and is expected to take around another 2 weeks, weather permitting. Traffic controllers will be present and motorists are advised to proceed with caution.

The geotechnical reports Council received have been included in the Design and Construct bundle of works for repairs to the largest road slips around the shire.

This includes major landslips on Kyogle Road located 500 m to 1.6 km west of Byangum Bridge.

Short-listed construction contractors are commencing the Concept design stage with the aim of having designs and tender pricing to Council by January. This may include further geotechnical test drilling to be carried out towards the end of the month (weather permitting).

Once designs are complete, Council will select the most suitable contractor to carry out the work.

Transport for NSW has confirmed in principal funding approval to cover the cost of repairs.

Traffic is reduced to one lane and is being controlled by traffic lights at the slip immediately west of Byangum Bridge.

Other slips along Kyogle Road allow 2 way traffic to pass but heavily constrict traffic. We ask motorists to proceed with caution.

Major patching works will commence on the road this week. There are 32 sites which will be addressed.

The process of rebuilding

Boreholes at Kyogle Road land slip

The list below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslips at Kyogle Road. Given our current knowledge of the sites, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Kyogle Road’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Kyogle Road, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Kyogle Road would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Caution Closed 

Last updated 10 November 2022

Reserve Creek Road will remain closed at the slip site until permanent repairs can be undertaken.

The landslip at Reserve Creek Road is a priority for Council and is included in our Design and Construct bundle of works established for the most significant landslip repairs around the Tweed.

The Reserve Creek Road landslip presents a major design and engineering challenge, with the road significantly undermined by a 15-metre high, near-vertical landslip which occurred during the February-March flood.

Short-listed construction contractors are commencing the Concept design stage with the aim of having designs and tender pricing to Council by mid-December. This may include further geotechnical test drilling to be carried out towards the end of the month (weather permitting).

Once concept designs are complete, Council will select the most suitable contractor to carry out the work as soon as possible.  Given likely timeframes for the successful contractor to finalise detailed designs, gain environmental approvals, and procure teams and materials the earliest start date on site is likely to be mid-2023. 

Council is encouraging contractors to consider providing temporary access before permanent works are completed if this can be proven to be safe and feasible.

Transport for NSW has confirmed in-principal funding approval to cover the cost of repairs.

Council is aware of the issues facing the local community and the significant connectivity impacts associated with the road closure and we are doing everything we can to expedite the repair process.

The process of rebuilding

The list below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslip at Reserve Creek Road. Given our current knowledge of the sites, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Reserve Creek Road’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Reserve Creek Road, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Reserve Creek Road would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Caution Short delay 

Last updated 10 November 2022

Traffic lights at Limpinwood Road major slip site.JPG

The geotechnical reports Council received last month have been included in the Design and Construct bundle of works for repairs to the largest road slips around the shire.

This includes the slips near Boxsell Road and Charbray Place.

Short-listed construction contractors are commencing the Concept design stage with the aim of having designs and tender pricing to Council by January. This may include further geotechnical test drilling to be carried out towards the end of the month (weather permitting).

Once designs are complete, Council will select the most suitable contractor to carry out the work.

Transport for NSW has confirmed in principle funding approval to cover the cost of repairs.

Patching works have been carried out to repair minor damage.

The process of rebuilding

Listed below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslips at Limpinwood Road. Given our current knowledge of the site, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical assessment (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Limpinwood Road’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Funding submissions (underway)

To secure funding, we will need to seek approval for the preferred solution from Transport for NSW, which includes cost estimates based on the geotechnical investigations.

  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Limpinwood Road, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Limpinwood Road would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Caution 

Last updated 10 November 2022

Mount Warning Road landslip

Mount Warning Road will remain closed at the slip site until permanent repairs can be undertaken.

Council has completed sealing part of the temporary side-track near Mavis’ Kitchen to reduce dust.

The temporary side-track was installed to provide access past a landslip that destroyed a length of road. 

Permanent works to repair the landslip will require more time. Transport for NSW has confirmed in principal funding approval to cover the cost of those repairs.

Short-listed construction contractors are commencing the Concept design stage with the aim of having designs and tender pricing to Council by January. This may include further geotechnical test drilling to be carried out towards the end of the month (weather permitting).

Once concept designs are complete, Council will select the most suitable contractor to carry out the landslip repair work.

The process of rebuilding

The list below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslip at Mount Warning Road. Given our current knowledge of the sites, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Mount Warning Road’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Funding submissions (underway)

To secure funding, we will need to seek approval for the preferred solution from Transport for NSW, which includes cost estimates based on the geotechnical investigations.

  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Mount Warning Road, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Mount Warning Road would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Caution Closed 

Last updated 18 October 2022

A section of Beltana Drive remains closed following advice from geotechnical consultants about the road’s safety.

Beltana Drive landslip

They have advised further movement or collapse of the scarp is likely, particularly following wet weather.

To ensure the ongoing safety of road users, the road has been closed at the landslip site.

Beltana Drive is a loop road therefore access to all residents can be maintained. Although some residents will be inconvenienced due to slightly longer travel times.

Bus services have been advised of this and arrangement have been made for school buses.

We understand these works may cause disruption and inconvenience. We ask for your patience as we respond to the additional damage caused to the local road network by 2 significant heavy rains in a month.

Roads are closed to keep motorists safe. Please don’t remove or tamper with road closure signs or barriers – it is a serious offence and could result in someone getting hurt or killed.

Geotechnical assessment updates

Beltana Drive landslip

Borehole drilling works have been completed. Awaiting  geotechnical report.

This is a complex and long process and given the wide extent of damage throughout the Tweed, it is difficult to give an accurate timeline at this stage however it is anticipated the road will be closed for at least 12 months.

The process of rebuilding

Listed below summarises the high level processes we need to follow to fix the landslip at Beltana Drive. Given our current knowledge of the site, it’s difficult to provide accurate dates for each part of the process. There may be opportunities to run some of those in parallel however, we won’t know until we start to confirm the preferred solution. The outline below will give you an idea of why the works will take at least 12 months.

  • Geotechnical procurement (underway)

Fixing landslips is a complex engineering task. It is crucial that the foundation of the slip is properly stabilised to prevent a similar failure occurring in the future. Specialist geotechnical engineers are used by Council to investigate the best option suited to Beltana Drive’s specific site conditions. Only then can the missing piece of road be constructed over this new foundation.

The geotechnical assessment is broken up into 2 stages:

  • Stage 1 is a preliminary assessment to make recommendations about the short term safety of the site.
  • Stage 2 involves boring holes to investigate the soil in and around the slip including scientific testing, this information is used to determine options to fix the slip.
  • Funding submissions (underway)

To secure funding, we will need to seek approval for the preferred solution from Transport for NSW, which includes cost estimates based on the geotechnical investigations.

  • Design and construction tender

We draft a design and construction document in preparation for the tender process. We then advertise the tender, evaluate all submissions then select the preferred tenderer based on the NSW legislation and our Procurement Policy which define specific processes and minimum timeframes. The tenderer then develops the design for approval by Council and Transport for NSW.

  • Environmental assessment

All work Council undertakes, including the repairs required on Beltana Drive, requires approval under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act – in much the same way as residents need a Development Approval to carry out renovations on their homes. This is to ensure there is minimal environmental impact during the construction of the work and that the final construction won’t cause any additional impacts to residents or the environment.

  • Consultation with the community

We will consult with residents and businesses who will be directly impacted by the works to ensure they are not adversely affected by our activities. If they are, we will put in place measures to minimise these impacts.

There are several properties through which we are likely to require access to carry out the work.

  • Construction

At high level, a typical construction process to fix significant damage such as those sustained along Beltana Drive would involve site establishment, excavation of slip areas, foundation works, wall construction or stabilisation structural works as well as earthworks, drainage, road subbase, pavement, line marking and safety barrier works.

At this stage, it is difficult to estimate the time required by the contractor to complete the works as it is dependent on the geotechnical solution as well as the expertise and resources of the contractor.

Last updated 13 July 2022

Temporary repairs to restore 2-lane access were completed on Saturday 14 May 2022.

This section of Tweed Valley Way is both a roadway and a hydraulic structure. It also provides a crossing for water, sewer, power and telecommunications. It will require various investigations, consultations with local stakeholders, environmental assessment and approvals, engineering design and planning approvals.

A specialist contractor will then be engaged to carry out the works. Given the site’s complexity and other pressing priorities across the Tweed, the permanent works may take up to 2 years to complete.

Read the media release for more information.

Flood recovery works

Last updated 24 November 2022

Major work continues on Scenic Drive plus another 8 major landslips around the Tweed  are at the design phase. We are also working on strategies to fast track the remainder of the repairs. However, there are still more than 220 major repairs in the design phase or yet to start.

Total road damages now amount to 3703 items with new damage still being identified.

Council has completed nearly 100% of Emergency Works (721 out of 722 works of varying degree) and 70% of Immediate Reconstruction works (1466 out of 2096 works of varying degree).

Engineering assessments are underway at the larger and more complex road damages, including landslips at Reserve Creek Road and Tyalgum Road. These engineering tasks are necessary and will take time.

Planning will continue to ensure works are undertaken as quickly as possible. Priorities are based on public safety, road hierarchy and efficiency of works.

As a result, residents may notice some damages are fixed as a crew works through a road and other damages are left for another time.

Our standard procedure is to notify affected residents and visitors of planned works via a letterbox drop. However, in the interest of expediency, this may not be possible during these flood repair works.

We apologise for any inconvenience and ask for your patience as we work toward more permanent repairs.

Our road crews and contractors will be making some permanent repairs to the following roads: